Guest Conductor

Erick Brunner

Erick Brunner

Erick has been involved in some sort of music-making his entire life. Growing up in a small Ohio town and being involved from the 1st grade in a very fine church music program set the stage for things to come. By the time he was in junior high he was holding down two assistant organist jobs!

The decision to keep going on this path led to Princeton, New Jersey, where he majored in organ and choral conducting at Westminster Choir College (WCC). Those precious, formative years were gifts from the gods, as it were, because Westminster Choir was (and is) the principal choral ensemble for the New York Philharmonic. Erick was privileged to work under such masters as Leonard Bernstein, Leopold Stokowski, Herbert von Karajan, Eugene Ormandy, William Steinberg, and Robert Shaw. He learned a lot about the large choral repertoire and how that literature moves many people, and why. After graduation he pursued graduate work in Princeton (at WCC) and continued to sing under Mr. Shaw during the summers.

In the early 70s Erick moved to Boulder, Colorado where he worked his way through a number of the larger church music programs over the course of 32 years. During that time Erick founded the chorus for the Colorado Music Festival and prepared many choruses for the Boulder Bach Festival. He also maintained a large voice studio throughout much of that time.

Ten years ago Erick took the plunge, vacated Boulder and moved to Taos, a place where he pretty much always spent vacation/spiritual time anyway. Attempting to retire then, his cover was blown by a friend (?) here and he’s been back in the music saddle ever since; conducting the Taos Community Chorus in his early years here and continuing duties as Director of Music at St. James Episcopal Church, working with his beloved choir and playing the organ. Erick is delighted to be back working with the TCC; especially since he’s getting to prepare/perform some of those glorious large choral works he loves so much.

 

%d bloggers like this: